Everything College Sports

For those interested in all things college sports

Jeremy Tyler going to Europe–Bravo let’s hope this is the beginning of the end of the one and done

Below is a post I put on the NCAA Double A Zone in response to NCAA staffer Greg johnson. There has been much said about Jeremy Tyler leaving high school to go play in Europe and earn a ton of money instead of staying in high school and being forced to play college ball for one year allegedly to get an “education.” Greg states that someone needs to explain to him why going to college for a year is the worst thing that can happen (in fact these kids rarely stay much past the first term, and saying they are actually going to college is debatable).

Greg–please. It is not a prison sentence and Sonny has never even alluded to that. He is saying what is obvious to anyone out there, even to those who purport to think this one and done is some educational panacea. Simply put Greg–for those of us who were or are in the trenches, this rule is simply a way to control the athlete, keep a free farm system, keep the money for the members of the association and the highly paid coaches, and limit someones right to earn a living when their skills are most marketable. There is no education about it when a kid is shepherded through courses to pass those “tough six hours” only to see them drop out after the national tournament once those millions have been earned for others. What’s the rush–you only have so much time to market athletic skills. Who are you to say he can’t do it when he is 17?? Continue reading

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April 29, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Is college athletics a free market

I was struck by a comment by my good friend Bob Boland at the College Sports Research Institute Conference in Chapel Hill, NC last week. I moderated a panel that included Craig Esherick, the former head men’s basketball coach at Georgetown, Boland, a former collegiate administrator, lawyer, sports agent, and now professor at NYU, Matt Denhart, an Ohio University undergrad representing the Center for College Affordability and Accountability, and Dr. Kadie Otto of Western Carolina, the current Executive Director of The Drake Group.

Bob made a comment regarding coaching salaries and athletic budgets in these tough economic times. He stated that he did not have a problem with coaches earning as much as they can because it is a free market.  Bob is one of the smartest people I know and I certainly understand his rationale, and currently without an anti trust exemption coaches salaries cannot be capped. In a perfect capitalistic economic system this makes sense–but in my opinion intercollegiate athletics (primarily at the D One level) does not exist in a logical economic system given that the generators of the income do not share equitably, or in many cases not at all, in the profits of the enterprise that create the market salaries for coaches. Continue reading

April 26, 2009 Posted by | Finance, Reform, Uncategorized | , , , | Leave a comment

Applications of Facebook in Athletics Development

Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...
Image via CrunchBase

This post was originally published by Athletics Development Frontier, which can be reached at www.developmentfrontier.com.

Currently, one of the biggest buzz words in business and sports administration school is the term new media. This word is used to define any type of advertising or communication medium other than radio, print or television. With the advent of blogs, Facebook, mass texts and Twitter, this staple of communication will be around for quite some time. Continue reading

April 20, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Coaches Salaries & Using Ohio State as an Example.

Ohio State Athletics Salaries from the Columbus Dispatch

Ohio State Athletics Salaries from the Columbus Dispatch

We all know that the discussion of salaries at major NCAA FBS institutions can keep us chatting in the hallways at work or in the classroom for hours. On April 13th, the Columbus Dispatch chronicled “A Decade of Growth” in Ohio State Athletics Salaries. Although, specific to Ohio State, the article reminds us of the tremendous growth over the past 10 years in salaries at the largest and most powerful athletics programs.

Part of me wants to praise Ohio State for supporting all of their coaches with good salaries. The job of being a coach at Ohio State or at any DI institution is not easy and most coaches are underpaid. I’m not talking about football and men’s basketball, but about the other 15-20 programs that DI schools sponsor. Remember, these are folks who place their livelihood in the hands of 17 year olds  during the recruiting process… please choose my school!  They are away from home a large portion of the year traveling with the team and recruiting. Even when they are in town, they are working crazy hours and dealing with everything from girlfriend/boyfriend problems their athletes are having to being a productive member of the athletic department and putting in hours of community service. So, that is the part of me that says, FINALLY – more coaches are being compensated fairly. Continue reading

April 14, 2009 Posted by | Coaches and Coaching, College Sports Business, Finance, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

The Race for the NCAA to Monitor Technology Advances

Let me first say, I am a huge NCAA fan from a business and sport competition perspective – but this seems to be a no win situation. Some of you may have seen a semi-humorous article in Bloomberg the other day. Well, it may not be funny if you work at the NCAA in Enforcement or if you are a coach that is not an early adopter of new technologies. Anyway, the Bloomberg Article, IPhone Athletes Race Past NCAA Cops,  is about the realities of trying to keep NCAA rules one step ahead of the athletes and coaches. Continue reading

April 6, 2009 Posted by | Legislation, NCAA Compliance Issues, Recruiting, Rules Violations | | Leave a comment

What’s in a Name?

Just a few weeks ago, a facility renovation five years in the making finally came to fruition, as supporters of the Miami Hurricanes Baseball Program celebrated the dedication of the completed “Alex Rodriguez Park,” in Coral Gables Florida.  A-Rod Park was funded in part by the controversial major leaguer of the same name as he made a donation of approximately $4 million in 2003.  Although Rodriguez never played for the Hurricanes, he was heavily recruited by the program before signing a major league contract in the early 1990s.

Rodriguez’s gift is rare, but not an anomaly in collegiate athletics, as professional athletes have been contributors to major projects in the past.  What is unique about this situation is the recent developments surrounding Rodriguez’s professional career and his admittance to using performance enhancing drugs.  What, if any, long term effects might this have on the University of Miami?  In addition, what example might this be setting for student athletes on the baseball team? Continue reading

April 3, 2009 Posted by | Baseball, College Sports Business, Facilities and Events | | Leave a comment

Collegiate Athletics Not Escaping Economic Concerns

The current state of the economy has people buzzing not only in Washington, but around college campuses all over the country as well. As institutions are coping with decreasing state aid and dwindling endowments, tough decisions are being made on every campus and athletics has not been immune. To date, six Division I institutions have officially dropped a total of 10 sports for the 2009-10 academic year. Unfortunately, the dropping of sports will only increase as institutions process the realities of their FY10 budgets.

If you look at the Division I institutions that have officially announced the dropping of sport programs for FY10 [Portland State, Wagner, Pepperdine, Northern Iowa, Vermont, Iona], none of these schools are considered Division I powerhouses. Couple the fact that they all have limited budgets and resources with an economic downturn, and you create a recipe for needing to make tough and radical decisions. Having been involved in the wrestling community most of my life, I am certainly not an advocate for dropping sport programs.

Continue reading

March 27, 2009 Posted by | College Sports Business, Finance, Uncategorized | | 1 Comment

The ACC Tournament- Recap (Part 3)

I hope all of you were able to watch and enjoy some of the great basketball that was played in the Georgia Dome last week. First hand, I can tell you that it was some of the most intense and hard played basketball I have seen. Just as in 2001 (the last time ACC was in Atlanta) Duke stole the show and came out on top.

Leading up to the tournament, we had a few things going against us. First, the economy is truly affecting our industry. This was the first year that the ACC released tickets for public sale for their Men’s Basketball Tournament. Typically the tickets are divided by the schools to be given to boosters and donors. This year, a certain amount of tickets were sold in packages for the entire tournament. No single game tickets were sold through the conference or the Georgia Dome. However, the ACC’s preferred secondary market ticket vendor -SeatExchange was selling single game tickets. This only created a minor problem when fans of teams who lost early wanted to sell their tickets away. In this situation we needed to be accommodating to the fans. Realizing that this event is so astronomically different than any other- we could allow controlled selling of tickets on the concourse just inside the gate area. We certainly did not want it to be seen in the seats or main concourse areas. Continue reading

March 24, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Recipe for Conference Tournament Site Selection

This time of year is exciting for college sports fans across the country as March Madness is in full swing. One of the perks is it puts men’s college basketball into some of the most famous venues our country has to offer like Madison Square Garden and the Georgia Dome. Each conference has different criteria for choosing the sites of the tournaments, and each provides different results for spectators and television viewers alike.

Regular Season Champion On-Campus Site
The classic method for choosing a tournament site is allowing the conference champion to host its basketball championships. This method is used most often by low-major conferences that either lacks the fan base or the funds to host at a neutral site. This method has both upsides and downsides. The main strength is its rewarding of home-court advantage to the regular season champion, giving the best team in the conference the best chance of receiving the highly coveted automatic bid. This also guarantees a large fan base if the host advances to the championship. This also leads to the most glaring negative, which is a significantly reduced fan base if the host is upset on its way to the championship. Continue reading

March 15, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Blogger Prediction: Title IX Loophole on Interest Survey Use May Soon Close

On March 11, 2009, President Barack Obama released an Executive Order establishing a White House Council on Women and Girls. The Council (comprised of top leaders of various governmental agencies) has been given 150 days to address areas in which gender inequities still remain and to develop recommendations for consideration in the form of a Federal interagency plan.

Q: How might this relate to collegiate sports?

A: This blogger’s prediction is that the debate over the use of email surveys in assessing Title IX compliance will resurface and that a recommendation to close the loophole may be forwarded. Continue reading

March 13, 2009 Posted by | Gender Equity and Title IX | , , | Leave a comment