Everything College Sports

For those interested in all things college sports

Applications of Facebook in Athletics Development

Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...
Image via CrunchBase

This post was originally published by Athletics Development Frontier, which can be reached at www.developmentfrontier.com.

Currently, one of the biggest buzz words in business and sports administration school is the term new media. This word is used to define any type of advertising or communication medium other than radio, print or television. With the advent of blogs, Facebook, mass texts and Twitter, this staple of communication will be around for quite some time. Continue reading

Advertisements

April 20, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Coaches Salaries & Using Ohio State as an Example.

Ohio State Athletics Salaries from the Columbus Dispatch

Ohio State Athletics Salaries from the Columbus Dispatch

We all know that the discussion of salaries at major NCAA FBS institutions can keep us chatting in the hallways at work or in the classroom for hours. On April 13th, the Columbus Dispatch chronicled “A Decade of Growth” in Ohio State Athletics Salaries. Although, specific to Ohio State, the article reminds us of the tremendous growth over the past 10 years in salaries at the largest and most powerful athletics programs.

Part of me wants to praise Ohio State for supporting all of their coaches with good salaries. The job of being a coach at Ohio State or at any DI institution is not easy and most coaches are underpaid. I’m not talking about football and men’s basketball, but about the other 15-20 programs that DI schools sponsor. Remember, these are folks who place their livelihood in the hands of 17 year olds  during the recruiting process… please choose my school!  They are away from home a large portion of the year traveling with the team and recruiting. Even when they are in town, they are working crazy hours and dealing with everything from girlfriend/boyfriend problems their athletes are having to being a productive member of the athletic department and putting in hours of community service. So, that is the part of me that says, FINALLY – more coaches are being compensated fairly. Continue reading

April 14, 2009 Posted by | Coaches and Coaching, College Sports Business, Finance, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Collegiate Athletics Not Escaping Economic Concerns

The current state of the economy has people buzzing not only in Washington, but around college campuses all over the country as well. As institutions are coping with decreasing state aid and dwindling endowments, tough decisions are being made on every campus and athletics has not been immune. To date, six Division I institutions have officially dropped a total of 10 sports for the 2009-10 academic year. Unfortunately, the dropping of sports will only increase as institutions process the realities of their FY10 budgets.

If you look at the Division I institutions that have officially announced the dropping of sport programs for FY10 [Portland State, Wagner, Pepperdine, Northern Iowa, Vermont, Iona], none of these schools are considered Division I powerhouses. Couple the fact that they all have limited budgets and resources with an economic downturn, and you create a recipe for needing to make tough and radical decisions. Having been involved in the wrestling community most of my life, I am certainly not an advocate for dropping sport programs.

Continue reading

March 27, 2009 Posted by | College Sports Business, Finance, Uncategorized | | 1 Comment

The ACC Tournament- Recap (Part 3)

I hope all of you were able to watch and enjoy some of the great basketball that was played in the Georgia Dome last week. First hand, I can tell you that it was some of the most intense and hard played basketball I have seen. Just as in 2001 (the last time ACC was in Atlanta) Duke stole the show and came out on top.

Leading up to the tournament, we had a few things going against us. First, the economy is truly affecting our industry. This was the first year that the ACC released tickets for public sale for their Men’s Basketball Tournament. Typically the tickets are divided by the schools to be given to boosters and donors. This year, a certain amount of tickets were sold in packages for the entire tournament. No single game tickets were sold through the conference or the Georgia Dome. However, the ACC’s preferred secondary market ticket vendor -SeatExchange was selling single game tickets. This only created a minor problem when fans of teams who lost early wanted to sell their tickets away. In this situation we needed to be accommodating to the fans. Realizing that this event is so astronomically different than any other- we could allow controlled selling of tickets on the concourse just inside the gate area. We certainly did not want it to be seen in the seats or main concourse areas. Continue reading

March 24, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Recipe for Conference Tournament Site Selection

This time of year is exciting for college sports fans across the country as March Madness is in full swing. One of the perks is it puts men’s college basketball into some of the most famous venues our country has to offer like Madison Square Garden and the Georgia Dome. Each conference has different criteria for choosing the sites of the tournaments, and each provides different results for spectators and television viewers alike.

Regular Season Champion On-Campus Site
The classic method for choosing a tournament site is allowing the conference champion to host its basketball championships. This method is used most often by low-major conferences that either lacks the fan base or the funds to host at a neutral site. This method has both upsides and downsides. The main strength is its rewarding of home-court advantage to the regular season champion, giving the best team in the conference the best chance of receiving the highly coveted automatic bid. This also guarantees a large fan base if the host advances to the championship. This also leads to the most glaring negative, which is a significantly reduced fan base if the host is upset on its way to the championship. Continue reading

March 15, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Guy in the Pink Jeans

I’ll admit before I even get going that this is slightly off topic, but hang in there reading it because it is definitely sport related. Many of you have probably experienced something similar so I thought I would share a story that happened to me tonight.

Let me set the stage… I have been in San Antonio for  a few days at the Sport and Recreation Law Association Conference, which was very very cool by the way. Today (March 7th), I flew from San Antonio to San Francisco where I am speaking to a class at Berkeley on Monday. In San Antonio, I was surrounded by some very smart people (attorneys, professors, and attorneys who are professors) who are totally up-to-date on current sport law and pretty much everything else that has to do with youth, intercollegiate, professional, and international sport. I’ll have to write about specifics of the conference another time. Continue reading

March 8, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized, Working in College Sports | | 3 Comments

The ACC Men’s Basketball Tournament (Part 2)

The process of hosting the ACC Tournament (and others like it) is a long one. The bids for host city for the 2009 tournament were completed in 2006. The conference set a date for the bids to be submitted from approximately four cities. After receiving the bids, the conference decided which city would suit them best for this year. The winning bid is essentially what is written into contract.

As I said before, the tournament success hinges on the collaboration of several different entities. This collaboration starts with the creation of the bid. Each entity is responsible for its own special offering to the tournament. In this case, the Atlanta Convention and Visitors Bureau is responsible for providing hotel and travel information for the bid. This is a vital piece of the bid because it assures the conference that Atlanta has the hotel, restaurants, and entertainment to ACCommodate thousands of fans traveling to the city. In many cases the ACVB creates relationships with certain hotels to provide the conference with discounted hotel rooms, team restaurant packages, or discount packages to attractions such as the aquarium, museums, etc. Continue reading

March 6, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, College Sports Business, Uncategorized | | Leave a comment

There’s Not One, Single Career Path

I’m working on a book for which I came up with the idea in 2004. (I finally convinced a former professor to join me in writing it.) As part of the research, I’m interviewing quite a few successful people in the sports industry. I recently interviewed a classmate and he brought up a very good point that I think is worth writing about here, especially considering the emails I get asking how to break into the sports industry.

If you want to be a doctor or an accountant or a teacher, it’s pretty clear what steps you need to take to get there. Even when you’re in junior high or high school, you have an idea of what you need to do. At that same age, you may know that you enjoy sports and want to work in the sports industry, but what’s the career path? The answer is that there’s not one clear career path. There may be similarities, but there aren’t any hard core specific paths. Continue reading

March 1, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized, Working in College Sports | | 1 Comment

Five Keys to the Game

In all my interaction over the years with students, whether it was during my time with the Portland Trail Blazers or events hosted by Sports Career Consulting (SCC), the question I get asked most frequently is focused on what steps are necessary for pursuing a career in sports.  It is a great question to be sure, and obviously one that many students would like to see answered.  It is not, however, one that is answered easily, nor is it one with any “correct” answer or  a magical solution.  The good news is that there are several key pieces of advice anyone interested in a career in sports should be aware of and we’ll share them in today’s blog post.  Rest assured that this is not any complex formula by any stretch, but one that I can assure you is paramount to breaking into the industry.  Here are our five keys to the game…

Five Keys to the Game

Key #1:  Be Passionate

Regardless of which career path you choose (sports, entertainment or otherwise), find something you can be passionate about.  Passion is one of the primary, underlying characteristics shared by the majority of people who find success in their chosen field.  Take Kobe Bryant for example…one could argue that very few have played the game of basketball with more passion.  It is that passion that drives Kobe to be one of the best (if not the best) basketball player in the world today.

Do not think for a second, however, that you need to be an athlete to be passionate about something. Consider Phil Knight, founder of Nike, who used his passion for running to fuel a passion for developing (and later selling) the perfect running shoe.  His passion turned into a multi-billion dollar global brand. Knight’s passion was one of the key ingredients in the recipe for Nike’s success. Continue reading

February 26, 2009 Posted by | College Sports Business, Uncategorized, Working in College Sports | , | Leave a comment

“Managers” for High School Football Players?

We all know that there are some key “players” in the basketball recruiting world. Many people question the ethics around relationships that develop between these young players and those that “help” them get recruited.

It seems that in at least in Kansas, football might be headed down that same path.  In a New York Times Article from Feb 3rd, Brian Butler identified himself as the trainer and manager of top high school football recruit Bryce Brown. In fact, the article stated that, “To get to Bryce Brown, coaches must go through Butler. He handles Brown’s workouts, recruiting and news media requests.” WHAT? This is a high school player, right? Not someone gearing up for the NFL Draft. Oh, and Butler also sells information on Brown and other players over the internet for $9.99/month or $59/year if you are interested.

For those not aware, Bryce Brown did not sign on national signing day and has yet to sign an NLI. The scholarship and NLI papers issued by Miami  (where he verbally committed in Feb 2008) on Feb 4th for signing day expired on Feb 18th and an anonymous representative from Miami was quoted as saying they would not issue new papers.  Amazingly, Butler was unaware scholarship papers expired at all and that Brown would sign on March 16th. Between his verbal commitment and his brother playing at Miami there was significant speculation he would end up there. However, Brian Butler also has indicated that Brown could skip college and enter the CFL for “$5 million a year for 3 years”. One problem with that math is that the CFL salary cap is $4.2 million and  the highest paid player is making $500,000 in the league right now with the league minimum about  $40,000. Continue reading

February 22, 2009 Posted by | NCAA Compliance Issues, Recruiting, Rules Violations, Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment