Everything College Sports

For those interested in all things college sports

All Good Things Must Come to an End

All good things must come to an end and The Everything College Sports Blog is no exception. This blog will be deactivated on January 1, 2010. I can’t tell you how much I (and OHIO students) have appreciated all of the contributors, readers, and comments over the past year. I have learned a lot about blogging and the support from OHIO students and colleagues has been exceptional. But, there are a lot of other great sport blogs (See my Blogroll for some ideas) and this one has become too time consuming to maintain successfully. So, I encourage everyone to visit other sport blogs and keep up with the world of college sport and working in the sport industry. Best of luck to you all!

November 5, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | 1 Comment

You’ve Got to Understand Database Marketing in Today’s Sport Climate

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This post was authored by Brandon Steffek, a 2009 Ohio University Sport Management graduate. Since graduation, he has been working for Full House Entertainment Database Marketing as Sales and Marketing Consultant.

Full House Entertainment Database Marketing provides targeted sales leads for direct marketing campaigns (direct mail, telemarketing, email). Over 600 sports teams and entertainment organizations have used Full House to find new business and residential customers. Full House works exclusively with sports and entertainment organizations to target businesses and consumers most likely to buy season tickets, group tickets and premium seating (suites, club seating, VIP clubs).

The following is intended to provide a brief overview of how teams use database marketing to improve their organization and generate new revenue. Whether it is professional or college sports; the principles are the same.

Database marketing from my experience can be defined as identifying new customers who possess similar characteristics of sport teams’ existing customers. Whether it’s a particular business industry, or demographic profile of a residential consumer, database marketing can be used to build custom databases of potential new prospects that can be reached through direct marketing campaigns. Database marketing can also be used to collect and market to existing customers. Continue reading

September 29, 2009 Posted by | Marketing, Ohio University, Uncategorized, Working in College Sports | 1 Comment

Everything College Sports Named One of the “100 Best Higher Education Blogs”

The Everything College Sports Blog was recently named one of the 100 Best Higher Education Blogs by  Online Degrees Hub. Online Degrees Hub provides up-to-date information on every online school, subject, and degree, and an help you find accredited programs in a variety of subject matters.

The intent of the Everything College Sports Blog is to allow Ohio University students (and everyone else) interested in college athletics the chance to discuss contemporary issues in college sports. Students, faculty, alumni, and other guests will author various blog posts and everyone is welcome to comment and discuss the posts. This is a forum to engage in new and creative solutions to age old issues in college sport as well as discuss current happenings around the country.

Thanks to all of you who read the posts, search jobs, and are part of the OHIO immediate and extended family.

September 22, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Summer Break

The Everything College Sports Blog is on summer break along with Ohio University. Postings will resume in September. Job postings will continue to be updated.  Thanks for your support!

June 28, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Job/Internship Search

It is the time of year when graduating students begin to panic if they haven’t received their dream job offer or even an offer for an internship. If you are one of those still looking for a position, HANG IN THERE. One of the best interns I ever had told me he sent out over 100 applications before he landed the internship with me (4 years later, he is now the Director of Marketing at a Division I institution). So, it will happen – it just might not happen tomorrow. Keep doing the right things to set yourself up to be successful, including;

1. Volunteer with a sport organization. It might be that your resume isn’t quite solid enough to land the job you are hoping for.

2. APPLY. APPLY. APPLY. Until you have a job, your job is finding a job. So, treat the job search like a job. You must get out of bed before noon and search for jobs and then jump through all the application hoops to apply. Sometimes, the application process is difficult and time consuming to weed out those that are not serious. Continue reading

June 10, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized, Working in College Sports | | 3 Comments

Roster Management Practice Questioned

The mention of Title IX results in different reactions from different people. I’ve always found myself at somewhat of a cross roads with Title IX. I have been active in the wrestling community most of my life and have seen opportunities eliminated in that sport. I am also a female who greatly benefited from Title IX. Along comes the Quinnipiac injunction, and Title IX has become a national issue once again.

On May 22, 2009 a federal judge issued an injunction preventing Quinnipiac from dropping its women’s volleyball program or any other female opportunities. The ACLU of Connecticut has taken on the case for the women’s volleyball student-athletes and coaches. Expect this case to get more and more interesting as it unfolds and moves forward in the judicial process. During the hearing last week, it came to light that Quinnipiac set roster minimums (floors) for its women’s sports and roster maximums (ceilings) for its men’s sports. This has become common practice nationally in order to ensure compliance with the proportionality prong of Title IX. However, what makes the Quinnipiac case interesting is that beyond these roster management numbers they were allowing men’s sports to cut student-athletes prior to the first competition and then add them back after that competition, and on the women’s side, coaches were carrying their minimums through the first competition without equipment or uniforms and then most of the women who were not allowed to travel or have uniforms and equipment would quit. Continue reading

June 1, 2009 Posted by | Gender Equity and Title IX, NCAA, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Do Not Pass Go, Do Not Collect $200, You’re Fired!

This post is not specific to college sports, but is is a MUST READ for anyone heading into any segment of the sport industry.

In event management, there are certain things that are non-negotiable.Two of those things, in my opinion and the opinion of many of my peers, are waivers and medical coverage. If an event manager doesn’t get waivers signed or allows someone to participate without signing a waiver–do not pass go, do not collect $200, immediate termination. We live in a litigious society. Not mandating that participants sign waivers is probably one of the single stupidest things that an event manager could do. The other immediately terminable offense is not having any or not having enough medical coverage. Continue reading

May 10, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | 1 Comment

UNO Athletics; The Students Have Spoken!

The University of New Orleans (UNO) Student-Athletes have had a rough couple of years. First, in 2005, Hurricane Katrina devastated the campus and athletic facilities. The result was the suspension of 9 athletic teams and decreased student enrollment. UNO Enrollment has still not recovered to pre-Katrina levels which has severely reduced the athletics funding available from student fees. This, plus recent State budget cuts (athletics share was going to be appprox. $1.5mil) have stressed the finances of the athletics department in a big way. Now, last week UNO students voted “NO” to an increase in student fees to keep athletics functioning.

The result of the “NO” vote by students will likely be the elimination of the entire athletics program. Only if the State Legislature steps in to help (or a major private donor) can the program be saved at this point. Continue reading

May 3, 2009 Posted by | College Sports Business, Finance, NCAA, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Jeremy Tyler going to Europe–Bravo let’s hope this is the beginning of the end of the one and done

Below is a post I put on the NCAA Double A Zone in response to NCAA staffer Greg johnson. There has been much said about Jeremy Tyler leaving high school to go play in Europe and earn a ton of money instead of staying in high school and being forced to play college ball for one year allegedly to get an “education.” Greg states that someone needs to explain to him why going to college for a year is the worst thing that can happen (in fact these kids rarely stay much past the first term, and saying they are actually going to college is debatable).

Greg–please. It is not a prison sentence and Sonny has never even alluded to that. He is saying what is obvious to anyone out there, even to those who purport to think this one and done is some educational panacea. Simply put Greg–for those of us who were or are in the trenches, this rule is simply a way to control the athlete, keep a free farm system, keep the money for the members of the association and the highly paid coaches, and limit someones right to earn a living when their skills are most marketable. There is no education about it when a kid is shepherded through courses to pass those “tough six hours” only to see them drop out after the national tournament once those millions have been earned for others. What’s the rush–you only have so much time to market athletic skills. Who are you to say he can’t do it when he is 17?? Continue reading

April 29, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Is college athletics a free market

I was struck by a comment by my good friend Bob Boland at the College Sports Research Institute Conference in Chapel Hill, NC last week. I moderated a panel that included Craig Esherick, the former head men’s basketball coach at Georgetown, Boland, a former collegiate administrator, lawyer, sports agent, and now professor at NYU, Matt Denhart, an Ohio University undergrad representing the Center for College Affordability and Accountability, and Dr. Kadie Otto of Western Carolina, the current Executive Director of The Drake Group.

Bob made a comment regarding coaching salaries and athletic budgets in these tough economic times. He stated that he did not have a problem with coaches earning as much as they can because it is a free market.  Bob is one of the smartest people I know and I certainly understand his rationale, and currently without an anti trust exemption coaches salaries cannot be capped. In a perfect capitalistic economic system this makes sense–but in my opinion intercollegiate athletics (primarily at the D One level) does not exist in a logical economic system given that the generators of the income do not share equitably, or in many cases not at all, in the profits of the enterprise that create the market salaries for coaches. Continue reading

April 26, 2009 Posted by | Finance, Reform, Uncategorized | , , , | Leave a comment