Everything College Sports

For those interested in all things college sports

Jeremy Tyler going to Europe–Bravo let’s hope this is the beginning of the end of the one and done

Below is a post I put on the NCAA Double A Zone in response to NCAA staffer Greg johnson. There has been much said about Jeremy Tyler leaving high school to go play in Europe and earn a ton of money instead of staying in high school and being forced to play college ball for one year allegedly to get an “education.” Greg states that someone needs to explain to him why going to college for a year is the worst thing that can happen (in fact these kids rarely stay much past the first term, and saying they are actually going to college is debatable).

Greg–please. It is not a prison sentence and Sonny has never even alluded to that. He is saying what is obvious to anyone out there, even to those who purport to think this one and done is some educational panacea. Simply put Greg–for those of us who were or are in the trenches, this rule is simply a way to control the athlete, keep a free farm system, keep the money for the members of the association and the highly paid coaches, and limit someones right to earn a living when their skills are most marketable. There is no education about it when a kid is shepherded through courses to pass those “tough six hours” only to see them drop out after the national tournament once those millions have been earned for others. What’s the rush–you only have so much time to market athletic skills. Who are you to say he can’t do it when he is 17?? Continue reading

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April 29, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

The ACC Tournament- Recap (Part 3)

I hope all of you were able to watch and enjoy some of the great basketball that was played in the Georgia Dome last week. First hand, I can tell you that it was some of the most intense and hard played basketball I have seen. Just as in 2001 (the last time ACC was in Atlanta) Duke stole the show and came out on top.

Leading up to the tournament, we had a few things going against us. First, the economy is truly affecting our industry. This was the first year that the ACC released tickets for public sale for their Men’s Basketball Tournament. Typically the tickets are divided by the schools to be given to boosters and donors. This year, a certain amount of tickets were sold in packages for the entire tournament. No single game tickets were sold through the conference or the Georgia Dome. However, the ACC’s preferred secondary market ticket vendor -SeatExchange was selling single game tickets. This only created a minor problem when fans of teams who lost early wanted to sell their tickets away. In this situation we needed to be accommodating to the fans. Realizing that this event is so astronomically different than any other- we could allow controlled selling of tickets on the concourse just inside the gate area. We certainly did not want it to be seen in the seats or main concourse areas. Continue reading

March 24, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

The ACC Men’s Basketball Tournament (Part 2)

The process of hosting the ACC Tournament (and others like it) is a long one. The bids for host city for the 2009 tournament were completed in 2006. The conference set a date for the bids to be submitted from approximately four cities. After receiving the bids, the conference decided which city would suit them best for this year. The winning bid is essentially what is written into contract.

As I said before, the tournament success hinges on the collaboration of several different entities. This collaboration starts with the creation of the bid. Each entity is responsible for its own special offering to the tournament. In this case, the Atlanta Convention and Visitors Bureau is responsible for providing hotel and travel information for the bid. This is a vital piece of the bid because it assures the conference that Atlanta has the hotel, restaurants, and entertainment to ACCommodate thousands of fans traveling to the city. In many cases the ACVB creates relationships with certain hotels to provide the conference with discounted hotel rooms, team restaurant packages, or discount packages to attractions such as the aquarium, museums, etc. Continue reading

March 6, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, College Sports Business, Uncategorized | | Leave a comment

The ACC Men’s Basketball Tournament (Part 1)

Hello all, I appreciate Dr. Lawrence allowing me to contribute to this blog. My name is Jeremy Hammond and I am a ’08 graduate of Ohio University in the sport management undergraduate program. I am now the Event Services Coordinator for the Georgia Dome. My job grows every day and I am surrounded by great people to learn from. My favorite part of the job is the interaction with the client-whether it be the ACC, SEC, Falcons, the bowl, GHSA-building relationships and gaining their trust. The program at OU prepared me for what I hope will be a long career in this industry.

The ACC is coming back to Atlanta for it’s Men’s Basketball Tournament (March12-15) for the first time since 2001. When an event of this scale comes to town, it takes a city-wide effort to make it a success. For the last 8-9 months, staff from the Georgia Dome, Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta Sports Council, and the Atlanta Convention and Visitors Bureau have been collaborating to ensure that the ACC walks away March 15 thinking “no-one does it like Atlanta”. Continue reading

February 26, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, College Sports Business, Facilities and Events | | Leave a comment

Kay Yow

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Women’s college basketball lost one of the best, Kay Yow, today (Jan 24, 2009) to cancer at the age of 66. Kay exemplified the ideals of education and college sport throughout her 38-year coaching career. Here is a very abbreviated list of her accomplishments compiled from the NC State Website, an article by ESPN, and my own limited knowledge:

  • NC State Head Women’s Basketball Coach 1975-09.
  • 737 college game wins during her career.
  • She was 680-325 at NC State, only three women’s coaches in DI have coached 1,000 games at one school.
  • 20 NCAA Tournament appearances (11 Sweet 16, 1 Elite Eight, 1 Final Four in 1998).
  • Even after being diagnosed with cancer in 1987, she coached the 1988 Olympic Team to a Gold Medal.
  • In 2002, she was inducted into the James Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame (only the 5th female coach to be inducted).
  • She won the ACC tournament in 1980, 1985, 1987 and 1991.
  • As recently as 2006-07, she coached the team to a Sweet Sixteen appearance, even after missing 16 games that season due to her illness.
  • An honorary Nike Shoe, the Kay Yow Air Huarache.
  • Most importantly, a lifetime commitment to mentoring young women during their college years.

Kay Yow began her NC State career a few years after Title IX was signed into law, but before anyone was taking the law seriously. As a coach, she witnessed the gains that could be made towards equality by doing the right things. The following excerpts are from a very well written ESPN article on Kay:

“As Yow once put it, ‘If a person really has a grateful heart, the door can open wide for so many good things to come your way.’ Women like Yow always remembered they were educators first, coaches second — and if that left relatively little time for their personal lives, such was the price of this kind of career happiness. They knew they were pioneers exploring not literal “land” but rather “turf” that traditionally had belonged to men. They knew there were barriers to knock down, but different ways to do that.”

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January 24, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, Coaches and Coaching, Gender Equity and Title IX, Uncategorized, Women's Final Four | | Leave a comment

An NCAA Homecoming

As the former diversity and inclusion intern at the NCAA, I knew sharing the 2009 NCAA Convention with my colleagues as a professional development trip opportunity would help strengthen their network and define their direction in the industry, especially as we search for summer internships. For me, being able to experience Convention as a delegate rather than a staff member was an interesting twist to my young professional career.

Due to our MBA class schedule and responsibilities, our first day at Convention was Thursday. After attending NCAA educational sessions, checking out the vendors at the Trade Show, listening to the State of the Association speech, watching Billie Jean King receive the NCAA’s Gerald R. Ford award, and attending the Honors and Delegates Celebration at the Newseum, I was already overwhelmed with nostalgia and a sense of homecoming. This time last year I was working with the Division II Student-Athlete Advisory Committee in Nashville, Tennessee.

Friday presented another full schedule. The Division I Issues and Legislative Forums, lunch with alumni, and a meet-and-greet reception with various professionals filled our day. I was able to share a unique experience with my colleagues on how Division I legislation is passed or overridden. Most people think that the NCAA has the power to create and implement legislation. False! It’s actually the membership who drives legislative decisions and now I have 9 other graduate students as witnesses.

Anyway, for the fourth consecutive year, Division I was faced with another override vote regarding men’s basketball coaches observing nonscholastic events in April. High profile delegate, Damon Evans (chair of the Division I Leadership Council and University of Georgia athletic director) led the discussion on why Division I delegates should oppose the override. Army athletic director and chair of the Division I Men’s Basketball Issues Committee, Kevin Anderson, and Kerry Kenny, outgoing Division I Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, also opposed the override. As a former Patriot League student-athlete, seeing Mr. Anderson and Mr. Kenny be two of the four speakers on the floor persuading the other delegates to oppose the override made me proud. Mr. Anderson’s statement, “We have to send a message, and if we don’t send a message we might as well take the ‘student’ off ‘student-athlete,’ ” reaffirmed why I believe there is magic in intercollegiate athletics.

As a young professional, I have found a common theme in working in intercollegiate athletics: service. If you are in this industry and aren’t in it to serve, you will have a short-lived career. With that mindset, we spent our Saturday morning helping NCAA staff finish up the Division II and III business sessions. We spent the evening touring the monuments and dinner in Georgetown with athletic administrators from my alma mater, American University. The city was buzzing in anticipation of the Presidential Inauguration events. We even saw the dress rehearsal for the actual event at the Lincoln Memorial.

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January 19, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, College Sports Business, NCAA, Ohio University, Sports Administration, Uncategorized, Working in College Sports | | 1 Comment