Everything College Sports

For those interested in all things college sports

Luxury Suites: Pro v. College

It has been a while since my last post, sorry! Ohio University has been very busy with the annual Sports Administration and Facility Management Symposium as well as frequent events celebrating the achievements of the undergraduates. The following is based a little bit on my own research, but is mostly the sharing of my own opinion.

As we all suffer through this downturn in the economy, high ticket prices and corporate spending on sports has caught the attention of everyone. The $800,000 Yankees suites got the media talking about corporations that are benefiting from Federal bailout money, yet are still purchasing high priced suites and other forms of premium seating for their clients while we all support their lifestyle. In the realm of college sports, we’ll have to see if any of this discussion trickles over into next season with regard to bad P.R. for any companies identified as spending big bucks for football tickets while they cut jobs, receive Federal funds from all of us, and their clients are trying to put food on their tables. Continue reading

May 19, 2009 Posted by | College Sports Business, Facilities and Events, Marketing, Sponsorships and Sales | 1 Comment

What’s in a Name?

Just a few weeks ago, a facility renovation five years in the making finally came to fruition, as supporters of the Miami Hurricanes Baseball Program celebrated the dedication of the completed “Alex Rodriguez Park,” in Coral Gables Florida.  A-Rod Park was funded in part by the controversial major leaguer of the same name as he made a donation of approximately $4 million in 2003.  Although Rodriguez never played for the Hurricanes, he was heavily recruited by the program before signing a major league contract in the early 1990s.

Rodriguez’s gift is rare, but not an anomaly in collegiate athletics, as professional athletes have been contributors to major projects in the past.  What is unique about this situation is the recent developments surrounding Rodriguez’s professional career and his admittance to using performance enhancing drugs.  What, if any, long term effects might this have on the University of Miami?  In addition, what example might this be setting for student athletes on the baseball team? Continue reading

April 3, 2009 Posted by | Baseball, College Sports Business, Facilities and Events | | Leave a comment

The ACC Men’s Basketball Tournament (Part 1)

Hello all, I appreciate Dr. Lawrence allowing me to contribute to this blog. My name is Jeremy Hammond and I am a ’08 graduate of Ohio University in the sport management undergraduate program. I am now the Event Services Coordinator for the Georgia Dome. My job grows every day and I am surrounded by great people to learn from. My favorite part of the job is the interaction with the client-whether it be the ACC, SEC, Falcons, the bowl, GHSA-building relationships and gaining their trust. The program at OU prepared me for what I hope will be a long career in this industry.

The ACC is coming back to Atlanta for it’s Men’s Basketball Tournament (March12-15) for the first time since 2001. When an event of this scale comes to town, it takes a city-wide effort to make it a success. For the last 8-9 months, staff from the Georgia Dome, Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta Sports Council, and the Atlanta Convention and Visitors Bureau have been collaborating to ensure that the ACC walks away March 15 thinking “no-one does it like Atlanta”. Continue reading

February 26, 2009 Posted by | Basketball, College Sports Business, Facilities and Events | | Leave a comment

Zero Waste Pays Dividends

While serving as event manager for UC Davis Athletics, I was fortunate enough to be on staff the same time a new football stadium was opened…fresh for the 2007 football season. The new facility, compared to larger FBS football stadiums, lacked luxury items such as suites, giant video screens, creative variety in concession offerings, and even lights for night play. However, what it lacked in luxuries, Aggie Stadium made up for in one admirable policy…zero waste.

Zero waste practices, while in place at some college dining commons around the nation, are still nearly impossible to find in athletic facilities. Not to be confused with a standard recycling programs that handle plastic bottles and sometimes paper, zero waste, in this context, simply means that all products of the facility (from the concession stands to the restrooms) are either recyclable or compostable. In theory, if no outside “items” are allowed into the stadium, the standard trash dumpsters after a home football game will be empty. Food wrappers, cups, paper products sold or distributed are all recyclable and uneaten food and other specialty items (such as eating utensils made of potato or corn byproducts*) are compostable.

Zero waste programs were designed with one goal in mind: to have a smaller impact of the environment due to the disposal of garbage from an athletic event. However, as noted in the November 10th issue of the Sports Business Journal, like programs can also save facilities money on waste disposal. Although not a college facility, the Seattle Mariners have apparently saved over $40,000 in trash fees by implementing a more aggressive recycling program at Safeco Field.** With the incredible benefit to the environment and to the facility/universities involved, it is surprising that more schools are not catching on.

Continue reading

January 6, 2009 Posted by | Facilities and Events, Football | | 2 Comments

   

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